Thermal properties of fired clay bricks from waste recycling. A review of studies


Published: 11 October 2019
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Authors

  • Ana Ramos Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Salamanca, Zamora, Spain.
  • M. Paz Sáez Department of Architectural Constructions, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
  • M. Ascensión Rodríguez Department of Construction and Agronomy, University of Salamanca, Zamora, Spain.
  • M. Natividad Antón Department of Construction and Agronomy, University of Salamanca, Zamora, Spain.
  • Jesús Gómez Department of Construction and Agronomy, University of Salamanca, Zamora, Spain.
  • Paulo Piloto Department of Applied Mechanics, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Bragança, Portugal.

The large waste volumes globally generated have increased environmental awareness, promoting waste recycling as a sustainable construction material. This study presents a review of researches that analyze the thermal behavior of eco-friendly clay bricks incorporating organic and mineral waste materials as an addition. Many of these works also provide data related to the composition of the material, and its physical, micro-structural and mechanical characteristics. Most of eco-friendly clay units increase the porosity of the ceramic, improving the energy efficiency of masonry enclosures, reducing the clay content and the energy consumption during the fire process. The positive effects of lightweight ceramics are an opportunity to improve the fire resistance inside green buildings.


Ramos, A., Sáez, M. P., Rodríguez, M. A., Antón, M. N., Gómez, J., & Piloto, P. (2019). Thermal properties of fired clay bricks from waste recycling. A review of studies. Fire Research, 3(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/fire.2019.71

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